Why Do Photographers Use The Rule Of Thirds And How?

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Why Do Photographers Use The Rule Of Thirds And How?

Why Do Photographers Use The Rule Of Thirds

Why Do Photographers Use The Rule Of Thirds And How?

Photography is the only form of art that has been living for quite a while and will live longer with the blessings of technology. And the hands behind this art are the photographers. Over time, the photographers established specific rules of compositions to make their pieces more enjoyable. 

And the rule of thirds is one of those rules that most photographers use to click their images. Also, this rule is known as the gold of all golden rules. 

The question is, why is this rule so famous and effective? And why do the photographers use the rule of thirds a lot? Let’s know!

What Is The Rule Of Thirds In Photography

The rule of thirds is among the golden of all golden rules of photography. Apparently, this isn’t actually a rule but a composition method to capture without focusing on a single subject but the whole scenario. 

In an in-depth analysis, a frame is generally divided into 9 different blocks made of 4 straight lines placed horizontally and vertically crossing each other. In most cameras and mobile phones, these lines are known as grid lines. If you focus on those grid lines, you’ll see four dots in the middle of the frame and separating the frame into 3 vertical portions. And, because the frame gets divided into three portions, the name rule of thirds establishes. 

This rule usually means keeping the subject in the most right or the most left corner of the frame and getting the background more in-depth.

Why Do the Photographers Use The Rule Of Thirds

Photography is one of the most prominent passions and professions. Though for some people, it is just turning on the camera and clicking pictures, it is artwork for the actual photographers. 

That’s why time to time, great photographers came and did experiments with the cameras to capture the best moments. And the experiments resulted in creating of some principles in photography. Those principles are known as rules. Accordingly, the rule of thirds is recognized as one of the most used and effective. 

By applying these rules, the photographers can click their shots with the best composition. Photographers mainly apply this rule when clicking portraits. However, this rule is also effective for videos. When any video or image is framed over the rule of thirds, the subject doesn’t remain the center of focus anymore.

Meanwhile, the subject becomes more objective, and the viewer gets more room to explore the surrounding of the subject. That’s how the photographer adds more value to his work by giving the viewer more space to explore the clicks. 

Mostly you will notice the use of this rule in all kinds of photographs, including wildlife, fashion, sports, vlogs, interviews, portraits, almost all. At a glance, this rule might seem the easiest, but sometimes the best photographer gets puzzled about applying this rule in their works. 

How To Apply the Rule Of Thirds Effectively In the Images

The rule of thirds isn’t a new thing for anyone. Every newbie to professional photographer uses this composition method to click their images. However, the difference occurs in using the rule knowingly or unknowingly. When professionals know precisely how to utilize this formula, newbies click without knowing. And the steps below we have prepared for those rising photography enthusiasts. Follow them properly to get your best shot.

Step 1: You can apply this rule to any camera, whether a DSLR, SLR, or cell phone. So, start by turning on the grid lines from the camera settings. After turning it on, you will see the grid lines on your camera screen. 

Step 2: Now, focus your camera on the subject. Now you will notice two horizontal and two vertical lines crossing each other on the screen. And those lines will create four dots in the middle. Two on the left and two on the right.

Step 3: Now place your subject on any of the dots you see and ensure you get a good view of the surroundings. This will help to add more depth to the images.

Step 4: Finally, click multiple images in all the dots. Compare the best click you’ve got. Use it.

Note: There is no rule that you must have to apply the rule of thirds in all of your images. The best practice is to click the same image usually and then click the same frame applying the rule of thirds. And finally, compare which shot seems the best. That’s how you can play safe and achieve the ideal outcome.

Why is the rule of thirds essential in graphics design?

The rule of thirds is equally vital in graphic design and photography. The rules help to maintain balance in the workpiece in graphic design. Also, the grid lines, when applying the rule, help the designer work with the asymmetrical designs easily.

Does rule of thirds apply to portraits?

The rule of thirds is applicable for all kinds of photography jobs, including portraits. Even applying the rule in the portrait helps to keep the image more organized and the frame positioned perfectly.

Where did the rule of thirds come from?

the rule of thirds was first introduced in 1797 in a book named “Remarks of Rural History” written by John Thomas Smith in a quote mentioning the work of Sir Joshua Reynolds from 1783.

Conclusion

The rule of thirds is one of the wizards of all principles of photography. Also, photographers around the globe prefer to use this rule in their works to make them more meaningful. 

Subsequently, the rule of third enhances the depth and quality of the image. However, it is not evident that you always have to apply this rule to get the best shot. Several other effective rules and composition types are equally effective as the rule of thirds.

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